PFTL News May 2017

PRE-MOTHER’S DAY SPECIAL CLASS

PARTNER EXERCISE  FOR MOMS AND OTHERS – MAY 13

Taught by Annette Loquercio and Helane Hurwith

We are offering a special class the day before Mother’s Day, on Saturday, May 13, for Moms  and others to workout with a partner.  Participants (age 15 and older) will be shown exercises that are fun and challenging, and specifically designed for two people to do together, This could be an interesting way to spend time with mom (or a friend) and get a good workout in the process.  Two times are offered:  12 noon and 2pm.  No set cost – pay whatever you want. Limited to 8 participants.  Call to register 847-251-6834 or email Julie@PFTL.net

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HIP PAIN (from ACE Certified January 2017)

Hip pain is a common problem for sedentary and non-sedentary individuals. Chronic pain is a sign that there is irritation or injury at a site. There are a multitude of conditions that can cause hip pain, from trochanteric bursitis to osteoarthritis. The great news is that movement is the panacea for many of these conditions.

In injury assessment, we talk first about the mechanism of injury. This is very simply a description of the condition(s) that led to the injury. By understanding the mechanism of injury, we better understand the injury itself and how to use exercise to heal, not harm.

First, visit a doctor –

Though chronic hip pain is frequently improved through movement training, other causes of hip pain can be caused by serious injury or unassociated with musculoskeletal tissue. Make sure you visit a doctor to rule out conditions that require medical intervention. Here are three common causes of hip pain:

  1. Chronic Sitting – The average American sits 13 hours a day. This staggering amount of inactivity causes an imbalance of the hip musculature. The hip flexors remain in a shortened position, while the glutes and deep hip rotators remain elongated. Add to that chronic dehydration and the result is tissue that more closely resembles beef jerky than healthy muscle tissue.

This tissue lacks the necessary flexibility and elasticity to allow for smooth and efficient movement. It tears more easily and becomes overstressed more easily, and the rigidity of the tissue leads to more rubbing against bone and bursae.

  1. Strength Imbalance – A strength imbalance is not the same as tightness or inelasticity. A strength imbalance occurs most often when one’s exercise regimen is consistent and unvaried. Runners are an excellent example of this type of athlete. Whether running 12 miles a week or 45 miles per week, runners often feel like they don’t need more or different exercise. The repetition of the same movement without variation builds strength in some muscles, while neglecting others. This imbalance puts an unnatural amount of strain on those muscles, resulting in overuse injury. This type of injury is often found at the tendinous origins in the pelvic complex
  2.  Skeletal Imbalance –Here, skeletal imbalance refers to the uneven stature or movement pattern that many clients demonstrate, which can be caused by so many things, including old injuries and leg-length discrepancies. When movements are not even or balanced bilaterally, one side will be the victim of added pressure, tissue friction or workload. These clients often fall victim to conditions such as bursitis or piriformis syndrome.

Fortunately, the fix for many of these hip issues can be found in the right movements.

Fix: Mobility –The best fix for immobility is mobility. Focus on improving range of motion of the hip flexors and hip rotators with gentle dynamic movement.  Your trainer can show you how to do this properly.

Fix: Elasticity – Improving the elasticity of that beef jerky-like tissue is best achieved through a combination of homework and loaded movement training. Two to three hours of movement each week is not enough to undo 100+ hours of inactivity each week—more focus is necessary.  Daily stretching, never sitting for more than one hour at a time, and drinking water throughout the day are good habits to form.

GARDENING – THE ORIGINAL MIND-BODY EXERCISE (from ACSM Health and Fitness Journal)

Long before mind-body fitness became fashionable, gardeners understood the zen of nurturing their harvest. Gardening relieves stress through the quiet focus of communing with nature. In a complex world, the simple act of planting seeds and watching them grow is therapeutic. Use this opportunity to practice some meditative breathing. Sit on a chair or bench in good posture. Place your feet flat on the ground and your hands on your lap. Inhale through your nose as you count up to four; pause at the top of your breath and slowly exhale through your mouth as you count down from four. Repeat, each time adding a count until you reach a count of eight. This will help relax your mind and body and make an excellent pregardening or postgardening ritual.

PFTL NEWS January 2017

CLASS INFO:

Qigong – Qigong is an ancient oriental self-healing art that enhances vitality and sense of well-being.  It is easily adapted to any physical limitation or fitness level.  It is considered the ultimate anti-aging exercise, adding years to our life and life to your years

6 Week Session -starts January 19; Thursdays from 3:34pm to 4:30pm.  Taught by Regina Wolgel, OTR/L.  Cost $100 for the 6-week session. Drop-ins $20 per meeting. Call Julie to register, 847-251-6834.

HEALTHY EYES

When we think about staying healthy and fit, we sometimes forget that our eyes are an important part of this.  The following is an excerpted article from Health.com (D. Chandri OD) with some insights to keeping our eyes healthy.

♦ Touching and rubbing your eyes – Whether you wear contacts or not, you’re asking for trouble by unnecessary poking and rubbing your eyes. Sometimes your eyes itch and you feel you have to rub, but it’s best to keep the lid closed and only touch the outside of the eye. Rubbing too hard can also lead to broken blood vessels and inflammation.

Another reason to keep your hands off? Your eyes are protected by mucous membranes—moist tissue that can easily collect dirt and germs—so they’re a great place for bacteria to grow. If you shake someone’s hand and then you rub your eyes, you’re transmitting those germs and there’s a good chance you can catch whatever cold he’s got.

♦ Annual eye exams – Vision changes aren’t even the most important reason you should still see an eye doc every year. It’s about getting your overall eye health checked out: There are no pain receptors behind the eye, so if you have a broken blood vessel or a tumor back there, you would otherwise not know it until it starts to interfere with your vision, or worse.

♦ Staring at devices all day (and night) – Electronic screens, like those on our computers, tablets, and smartphones, emit blue light, which some eye doctors believe to be as harmful as the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Plus, focusing on anything for hours on end can cause eye strain and headaches. Remember the “20-20-20” rule. Every 20 minutes, look at an object at least 20 feet away, for at least 20 seconds.

♦ Applying eyeliner to your waterline – Even though makeup artists often swear by putting liner on the inside of your lower lashes, it’s actually quite risky. When you put liner inside your eye, you’re mixing it with your tears. If you’re wearing contacts, your lenses then get coated in tiny makeup particles, which can deprive your eyes of oxygen. And even if you’re not wearing contacts, those makeup particles can also be carrying germs that can cause infection.

Liquid liners are especially dangerous since the applicator tip sits in a tube that can harbor bacteria. Soft pencils are safer since they are continuously being worn down and a new “tip” is exposed, but she still recommends applying them outside the eye only.

♦ Sleeping in your makeup – Hitting the sack without washing your face can do more than leave mascara stains on your pillow; it can also clog the glands around your peepers and lead to irritated skin, pimples, and even styes—painful, raised bumps that can appear on or around the eyelids.

False lashes are a no-no too. If you’re sleeping in them and rubbing them, that glue can get into your cornea and lead to major inflammation.

♦ Using expired solution, lenses, or drops – Contact lens solutions all have an expiration date that should be followed. These solutions have cleansers that kill bacteria on your lenses, so you want to make sure all of those ingredients are still doing their job.

The same thing goes for the lenses themselves, which sit in a sterile solution that can break down over time. Artificial tears and prescription eye drops also have expiration dates that you should pay close attention to, as well. And definitely don’t rinse your contact case or store contacts in any liquid that’s not sterile, like tap or distilled water; both have been associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis, a drug-resistant corneal infection.

♦ Overuse of OTC redness-reducing drops – The kinds you buy in the drugstore contain vasoconstrictors, which shrink blood vessels and temporarily make your eyes appear less red. But they also contain preservatives and other chemicals that can make your problem even worse in the long run, and it’s only a matter of time before you experience a rebound effect.

If your eyes are constantly red or irritated, it’s important to see an eye doctor who can get to the root of your problem. He or she can recommend an over-the-counter product (like a moisturizing “artificial tears” drop) or suggest other forms of treatment.

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR CLIENTS AND FRIENDS!!

PFTL News August 2016

SAY NO TO SUMMER WEIGHT GAIN

So you spent the winter and spring working hard.  You exercised consistently, you were careful to eat more healthy foods and you watched your portion sizes.  Why?  So you would look great at the lake and have plenty of energy to enjoy summer.  You greeted summer with a healthy, better toned body. But summer, in spite of all the fun and relaxation it brings, can be tricky and deal us a cruel blow when it comes to our fitness.

Have you noticed the scale creeping up a little over the last couple of months?  If so, you are not alone. Summer is a very easy time to overindulge and pick up those pounds that you shed during the winter months.

Remember that bad habits creep in slowly.  Perhaps you are skipping your workouts a couple days each week, because ‘You have so much to do.’ Or maybe you have been indulging in unhealthy food or drinks a little more frequently when you are with friends.  It happens-little by little.  It happens one small choice at a time.  But those choices add up fast.

If you realize that you have been slipping up, it’s not too late to turn around and get back on track. Really!  There is still plenty of summer left for you to regain whatever ground you might have lost and get back to awesome.

Here are a few common reasons that people gain weight in the summer and how to remedy them.

  1. Disrupted sleep cycle. Summer brings with it more daylight and longer days.  This extra sunshine can cause our circadian rhythms to change which causes us to sleep less.  But if we don’t get enough sleep, our bodies will respond by packing on a few extra pounds!  The solution?  Be diligent to get at least seven hours of sleep each night.
  2. Baby, it’s hot out there! When it’s hot and humid, we tend to move around less.  Our energy is lower and besides, who wants to sweat even more, right?  But the less you move, the slower your metabolism is and the fewer calories you will burn.  Be intentional about keeping up with your exercise.   Just keep moving.
  3. On the road again. Summer meals travel and travel means healthy eating just got harder.  Eating on the road presents big challenges if you are trying to eat clean.  Before your summer trips, brainstorm some ways to reduce the amount of fast food that you will consume while you are away.  Consider packing a cooler with hummus, nuts, lean proteins sources like chicken, fresh fruit and raw veggies.
  4. Caution: Cookouts!  Ahhh…summer cookouts, parties, family reunions.  All this spells danger because the food at these festivities is usually about as unhealthy as you can get!  Make sure you pass on the hotdogs, potato salad, oily salad dressings and rich cakes.  Look for grilled vegetables, fresh fruit and lean cuts of meat prepared without greasy marinades.

Don’t let the summer creep undo all the hard work you’ve done to get you where you were in May.  Make up your mind to finish well this summer.  Your future self will thank you!

TRAINER’S CORNER

NEW CLASS  from Annette Loquercio, MS Exercise Physiology

When:  Wednesday at noon (or 12:30pm) and/or Tuesday at 6pm. Cost:  $120 for 6-week session for either class.

Hello to all our dedicated clients who are working towards achieving their fitness goals. As many of you know, I am also dedicated to fitness AND working with you to help compliment your training sessions. I can offer you an extra boost by supplementing your regular training sessions with a small group class.

I am excited to be able to offer our clients a class that will show you some new ways to enhance your current efforts to achieve better endurance and strength…..along with muscle-shaping and quite possibly losing unwanted inches.  The class will consist of using our bodies in all planes of functional movement with exercise modalities that use only our body weight and gravity.  Resistance may be added as the class progresses.

Come and try out this opportunity to add to your training efforts!  I can guarantee you’ll leave these sessions with new and effective ways that will greatly add to many areas of your life outside the gym !

Contact Julie Cohen to register 847 251-6834

KEEP MOVING TO PREVENT METABOLIC SYNDROMEResearch has shown that physical inactivity is a primary cause of each of the metabolic syndrome risk factors, and that physical activity and exercise are primary prevention strategies for these risks.

Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of 3 to 5 of the following risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes :

  • fasting plasma glucose ≥100 milligrams per deciliter, or undergoing drug treatment for elevated glucose
  • HDL cholesterol < 40 mg/dL in men or < 50 mg/dL in women, or undergoing drug treatment for reduced HDL cholesterol
  • triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL, or undergoing drug treatment for elevated triglycerides
  • waist circumference > 40 inches in men or > 35 inches in women for people of most ancestries living in the United States
  • blood pressure ≥130 millimeters of mercury systolic or ≥85 mm Hg diastolic, or undergoing drug treatment for hypertension

CLIENT’S CORNER

PFTL client Richard Sobel, participated in the 2016 USA Track and Field Illinois, Masters/Open Outdoor Championships on June 25.  He won the Masters High Jump competition (Age 65 -69 Division), beating his opponent by .15 m.  Congratulations, Richard!

PFTL News June 2016

NEW CLASSES STARTING IN JUNE  – Contact Julie Cohen to register for any of these classes.  Email Julie@pftl.net or call 847-251-6834.

Basic Full-Body Tune-Up” – 60-minutes – 6-weeks – Starts Wednesday, June 15 from 4pm-5pm. Taught by personal trainer, Linda Meyer, CPT, this group class (min. 4; max. 5 participants)  focuses on flexibility, stability, strength, balance and endurance. It is designed as a full body workout with the aim of helping each person improve their overall fitness level.

Beginner level of fitness: this is a perfect class for motivated individuals who currently lack the strength, balance and flexibility they once had, and want to regain these qualities. The cost for this 6-week class is $100 per participant.

Functional Strength and Cardio – 60 minutes- 6 weeks- Starts Thursday, June 16 at 3pm (may meet on Tuesdays as an alternative).   This class uses various forms of equipment, with intervals of cardiovascular exercise. A core segment would include balance and Pilates exercises. It  also includes some game-like activities, e.g. obstacle courses and partner activities to achieve a fun whole body work-out. Taught by Ellen Flaxman, MS, CPT, this class is designed to be fun as well as an effective way to improve fitness. This is an intermediate level class. Cost is $100 for the 6-week course. We will need a minimum of 4 participants; max 5. The cost for this 6-week class is $100 per participant.

Theme-based Yoga Classes – Two new classes- Sundays at 10am and Tuesdays at 3pm. 60 minutes each – 6 week session- Starts Sunday June 12 at 10am and Tuesday, June 14 at 3pm. Taught by Jenny Klein, who incorporates Ashtanga style with other types of yoga into a hatha or basic practice. Each class is based on a different mind-body theme, where the poses match the theme. Classes are suitable for the beginner, the intermediate and even the more advanced student who wants a back-to-basics practice. Jenny guides alignment and breath, but with the understanding that every person has to respect what his or her body can do on the mat on any given day. We will need a minimum of 4 participants; max 5. The cost for this 6-week class is $100 per participant.

Free Walking Clinic -Learn how to get the most benefit out of walking as exercise, while walking in beautiful Gillson Park, Wilmette. Mondays and Thursdays starting June 13 through September 29; 5:30pm-6:30pm.  Debora Morris, Julie Cohen, Linda Meyer and Leslie Cohen will be leading and/or assisting.   Each meeting Includes warm-up, stretching, inclines, steps, balance and coordination. All fitness levels welcome. We meet at Wallace Bowl in Gillson Park.

SURPRISING EFFECT OF DRINKING TOO MUCH CAFFEINEFATIGUE

If you think drinking a lot of coffee all day long will give you more energy, think again.

Caffeine works by stimulating the central nervous system. Specifically, the chemical gooses the adrenal glands into releasing hormones — namely cortisol and adrenaline — that tell the body to go faster. The short-term result can be increased focus and better hand-eye coordination. But overdo caffeine on a regular basis and, eventually, the central nervous system runs out of gas. If you don’t restore yourself with sleep, proper nutrients and relaxation, you’ll quickly get into a cycle of short-term energy bursts followed by increased fatigue.

Besides fatigue, heavy coffee drinkers may also experience jitters, agitation, insomnia, heartbeat irregularities, frequent urination.

What can you do: It is advised to limit your daily dose of caffeine to less than 300 milligrams (mg). As a reference, a 12-ounce cup of Starbucks brewed coffee packs 260 mg of caffeine, while a 12-ounce Americano (two shots of the coffee chain’s espresso added to hot water) contains 150 mg. A 12-ounce cup of black tea, on the other hand, contains roughly 100 mg and green tea only 50 mg.

What’s a healthy amount for you? Most people know what amount their system can handle.  You may also want to support your adrenal glands with B vitamins (especially B5/pantothenic acid), vitamin C and licorice. Also, fuel up on healthy, whole foods that boost and maintain your energy.

TIPS FOR BIKE SAFETY (from State Farm newsletter May 2016)

Biking riding (instead of car riding) can save money, fight pollution and help you stay in shape. The bike rider, however, should be aware of the following to stay safe on the road.

Give a Good Once-over – Before you set off, make sure the brakes and gears work properly and that the tires are inflated correctly.  Over inflation can cause blow-outs.

Know the Rules of the Road-Your bike is considered a vehicle, so laws that apply to motorists also apply to you. If you’re biking on the road, you should:

  • Obey all traffic lights, road markings and stop signs.
  • Ride with traffic, and use the right lane or bike lane.
  • Use hand signals to indicate turns and lane changes.

Wear a Helmet – A properly fitted helmet is a must-have. Helmets can reduce the risk of brain injury or other head trauma if you’re involved in a crash. But remember: Helmets are designed to withstand only one crash. Replace yours after any crash, and never wear a helmet with cracks, missing pieces or other damage

PFTL NEWS October 2015

NEW CLASS – PILATES MAT  – 60-minute – 6-weeks ; starts Tuesday, October 20 at 1pm

 Former ballet dancer, Ellen Krafft, will be teaching this new class.  She has been teaching Pilates since 1996; Ellen blends traditional Pilates with ballet training to create a movement class which addresses alignment, core strengthening, balance and flexibility.  Cost for the 6-week class is $120.   Contact Julie to register for this class; 847-251-6834.

NEW CLASS — BASIC FULL-BODY TUNE-UP – 60-minute – 6-weeks – Starts Wednesday, October 21 at 3PM.

Taught by personal trainer, Linda Meyer, CPT, this group class (max. 5 participants) This class will focus on flexibility, stability, strength, balance and endurance. It is designed as a full body workout with the aim of helping each person achieve his/her fitness goals.  Beginner level of fitness: this is a perfect class for motivated individuals who currently lack the strength, balance and flexibility they once had, and want to regain these qualities. Call to register 847-251-6834.

WHY IT IS SO HARD TO STAY ACTIVE

“If it weren’t for the fact that the TV set and the refrigerator are so far apart, some of us wouldn’t get any exercise at all.”
– Joey Adams

 “Whenever I feel like exercise, I lie down until the feeling passes. “
– Robert M. Hutchins

You know you should exercise, since it’s good for you. So why is it so hard to stay active? Turns out, the reasons might not be what you think. Here’s a look at what may be preventing you from sticking with an exercise routine — and suggestions on how to keep at it.

  1. You’re Working Out for Weight Loss – This is a surprisingly bad motivator when it comes to getting you to lace up those sneakers. In one study, some women who exercised to lose weight, exercised less, while other women, who exercised to feel better and curb stress, worked out more.

The fix: You should remind yourself often of all the ways exercise makes you feel good, like having more energy and getting better rest, that have nothing to do with weight loss.

  1. You’re Overdoing It – There’s no doubt that exercise can be a big life change, but at the beginning the change shouldn’t be drastic. Pain and exhaustion are de-motivators.

The fix: Ease into an exercise routine and start slowly.

  1. You Feel Bad About Your Body – Maybe you’re self-conscious about your stomach or you don’t like the way you look in yoga pants. Or maybe, exercise conjures up unpleasant memories of school gym classes.

The fix: Working out in the privacy of your own home is an option. Find a workout that’s right for you on a DVD, YouTube channel, and/or hire a personal trainer to get your started.

  1. You Chose the Wrong Workout – If you hate the type of exercise you are doing (walking on treadmills, lifting weights, etc), rethink about what you enjoy doing. Chances are physical activity was fun at some point in your life: ask yourself why you enjoyed it.

The fix: If you’re stumped, think of trying something you’ve always wanted to do, but never had the chance to do, or something you enjoyed in the past. Biking, roller skating, dancing, yoga are activities that you may have enjoyed doing, but somewhere along the line just forgot.

  1. You’re in Pain – A bad back, sore knee, or arthritis can make getting fit a challenge. But if you’ve got a chronic condition, you probably need exercise even more.

The fix: Ask your doctor for a prescription for physical therapy. It can help so much, and it’s often covered by insurance. The physical therapist will teach you safe ways to get fitter and stronger.

SUGAR-SWEETENED BEVERAGES LINKED TO GOUT AS WELL AS OBESITY, DIABETES, AND HEART DISEASE (excerpted from Medscape Medical news Oct. 2015)

Sugar-sweetened beverages are currently the largest source of added sugar in the diet — accounting for about 50%. The World Health Organization and 2015 US Department of Agriculture Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee recommend limiting intake of all added sugars to no more that 10% of total energy intake (equivalent to about 12 tsps of sugar). One 12-oz serving of soda alone contains about 10 to 12 tsps of sugar!

The new study provides an analysis of data for potential replacements of sugared beverages: water is best, and unsweetened coffee or tea are acceptable, while fruit juices and artificially sweetened beverages are less ideal, but still better than sugar-sweetened drinks.

Fructose, naturally occurring in whole foods such as fruit and vegetables is generally not a problem. Such fructose is absorbed more slowly due to the fiber content of whole fruits and vegetables, whereas fructose in beverages is absorbed rapidly.

The most important information is that sugar-sweetened beverages are linked to weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, and gout, and that to reduce risk of these conditions and to promote health and overall well-being, they should be replaced with healthier options.

Beverages containing added sugar contribute to weight gain because they do not promote satiety, leading to increased food intake. And because of their high amounts of rapidly absorbable sugar, they induce rapid spikes in blood glucose and insulin levels.

Fructose in these beverages — from any sugar or high-fructose corn syrup — also promotes the accumulation of visceral fat, elevates LDLs (bad cholesterol), and accumulates fat deposits under the skin. Fructose also increases production of uric acid, which has been linked to gout and insulin resistance.

ROTARY CLUB OF WILMETTE BIG BOOK DRIVE

The Rotary Club of Wilmette has its annual Book Drive from October 1-November 16.  If you have any books to donate, in good condition, suitable for children from pre-school to high school, please bring them to the studio.  We have a box for collecting the books. The books will be distributed to children in inner-city schools in Chicago.