Rotary Club of Wilmette Event

Dear PFTL Client (past and present),                      

As you probably know, I am an active member of the Rotary Club of Wilmette.  Our Club will be having an annual gala fundraiser on Thursday, March 7, 2019 at the Valley Lo Club, in  Glenview,  from 5:30pm-9:30pm.  See the attachment.

Several PFTL clients have come to this event in the past, and said they were glad they had attended.  This will be an exciting night of good food, entertainment and a chance to win a weekend and show in Las Vegas. Additionally, proceeds will benefit local charities that Rotary supports, as well as international humanitarian efforts.

Among the many activities will be a dinner (salmon, filet mignon or vegetarian), live entertainment by interpretive artists from Las Vegas, of Dean Martin and Barbra Streisand, a silent and live auction, and a Vacation/Cash raffle, 

Prepaid tickets are $100 per person ($125 at the door). Each event ticket comes with a complimentary $35 raffle ticket.

Additional raffle tickets are $35 each, or 2 for $45, or 5 for $100.

Let me know if you are interested in coming.  You can purchase event tickets, and/or donate online through a link on our website, www.wilmetterotary.org .  If you want to save the service fee, just write me a check, and give me the name of everyone who is coming with you.

Best regards,

Debora Morris

847-722-2115

PFTL News February 2019

SOMETHING IS BETTER THAN NOTHING (From ACE Healthy Living Jan 16, 2019)

A key barrier to being physically active is an all-or-nothing mindset. Unless there is time for a full workout, why bother to start it at all? What is the point of eating carrots for dinner if I ate two cupcakes at work today? It’s Friday and I didn’t get one workout in this week—why bother doing one now? I have forgotten to drink water all day—well, I might as well have another soda. This type of thinking subconsciously drives disengagement in positive behaviors.

Although it doesn’t work with everything, the idea of “something is better than nothing” nicely applies to healthy behaviors. In other words, it is better to do something good—however small or seemingly insignificant—for your health and well-being than nothing at all.

Not convinced? Consider, for example, that a five-minute exercise interval performed once an hour may improve glucose and insulin levels in obese individuals better than one single longer session (Holmstrup et al., 2014).

Another study found that people who rode 10 minutes on a stationary bike had a sharper cognitive response to specific tests compared to individuals who read a magazine for the same amount of time (Samani and Heath, 2018). And immune function may be significantly enhanced with a 20-minute bout of exercise (Dimitrov, Huelton and Hong., 2017). As you can see from this small sample, the research confirming that something (in this case, a small amount of exercise) is better than nothing is encouraging.

Specifically, some movement is better than none. Standing is better than sitting. Walking or moving around is better than standing still. The same is true for other health behaviors that often feel challenging for some people. For example, drinking some water each day is better than drinking none. Eating some fruits and vegetables is better than eating none. Getting some sleep is better than getting none.

Here are some practical ideas for adding small doses of physical activity and movement into your daily life:

  • Walk around your house while you are brushing your teeth.
  • Every time the phone rings, go for a walk or do some wall-sits.
  • Stand up once every 30 minutes and breathe deeply for 2 minutes while doing standing squats.
  • Dance your way through household chores (it’s way more fun!).
  • Convert your work station into a standing/active station.
  • Make family time an active time.
  • Anytime you have to wait for something, do squats or calf raises.
  • Every time you have to use the restroom, do five push-ups (after might be best!).
  • Perform standing lunges while fueling up your car.
  • Go for a brisk 10-minute walk after dinner.

Adopting a few small healthy habits has the potential to progress into more healthy patterns over time and gives you the opportunity to experience what reaching your goal might feel like. Doing something rather than nothing also provides a sense of accomplishment, which initiates positive self-talk and self-empowerment.

YOU NEVER AGE OUT OF HAPPINESS AND HEALTH (from Guest Writer, Jason Lewis. Jason is passionate about helping seniors stay healthy and injury-free. He created StrongWell to share his tips on senior fitness.  His website is strongwell.org )

Happy, healthy seniors have one thing in common: they never give up on life. And thanks to modern medicine and advanced technology, seniors are aging healthier than ever.

Pay attention to your gut – You already know that you shouldn’t ignore your “gut” feelings. But new research suggests that your intestines have a bigger role in your health than previously thought. Researchers have found that the healthiest seniors are those with a diverse microbiota. Eating fermented foods, taking a probiotic supplement, and abstaining from antibiotics unless absolutely necessary, are all ways to improve gut health and the population of good bacteria in your gut’s microbiome.

Up your energy levels – There are several ways to improve your energy levels, such as getting enough sleep and eating foods that are high in protein, fiber, complex carbohydrates, and vitamins. If you find that lifestyle changes aren’t enough, talk to your doctor about adding an energy supplement to your daily routine. Don’t just grab the first bottle off the shelf, however. Take the time to evaluate your actual needs and the options available.

Exercise for 30 minutes each day – According to Genesis Health + Fitness, 30 minutes is all it takes to change your life. Half an hour of exercise each day can help you lose weight, reduce stress, and lower your chances of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Plus, exercising can help keep your memory sharp.

Avoid brittle bones – Osteoporosis is a condition that leaves you with bones that can break without warning, and you may have to limit physical activities. The Mayo Clinic explains, however, that physical activity is one way to keep your bones healthy. Getting enough calcium is also important. If you’re not a milk drinker, make a point to eat calcium-fortified foods, dark green leafy vegetables, and salmon.

Thwart loneliness – Senior loneliness is an epidemic that, according to the Washington Post, is just as harmful as being a lifelong smoker. While it’s perfectly normal to feel lonely sometimes, don’t be afraid to drag yourself out of the house to attend church, visit the senior center, or volunteer reading to children at your local elementary school.

Don’t let age get in the way of your well-being. By implementing small changes, such as keeping tabs on your gut health and social activities, you’ll make your health a priority all year long.